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Rethinking Orientalism Women, Travel, And The Ottoman Harem by Reina Lewis

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Published by Rutgers University Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Turkey,
  • Women"s Studies - History,
  • Social Science,
  • Islamic Studies,
  • Women"s Studies - General,
  • Sociology,
  • Women,
  • Middle East - Turkey,
  • History,
  • Harem,
  • Harems,
  • Orientalism

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages297
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8026096M
ISBN 100813535433
ISBN 109780813535432

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Reina Lewis is Professor of Cultural Studies at the University of East London. She is author of "Rethinking Orientalism: Women, Travel and the Ottoman Harem" and "Gendering Orientalism: Race, Femininity and Representation," She is editor, with Sara Mills, of "Feminist Postcolonial Theory," Nancy Micklewright is a Program Officer at the Getty Foundation in Los Angeles.4/5(1). During the nineteenth century, the figure of the passive, oppressed, yet highly sexualized female of the Muslim harem became the pivotal figure of Western orientalism. Despite recent challenges to orientalist thinking, however, an enduring mystique continues to surround Western perceptions of Eastern women. In Rethinking Orientalism, Reina Lewis makes a major contribution to correcting the Reviews: 1. Rethinking Islamic Studies upends scholarly roadblocks in post-Orientalist discourse within contemporary Islamic studies and carves fresh inroads toward a robust new understanding of the discipline, one that includes religious studies and other politically infused fields of inquiry. Editors Carl W. Ernst and Richard C. Martin, along with a /5(2).   Restating Orientalism offers a bold rethinking of the theory of the author, the concept of sovereignty, and the place of the secular Western self in the modern project, reopening the problem of power and knowledge to an ethical critique and ultimately theorizing an .

Orientalism is a book by Edward W. Said, in which the author developed the idea of "Orientalism" to define the West's historically patronizing representations of "The East"—the societies and peoples who inhabit the places of Asia, North Africa, and the Middle East. Said argued that Orientalism, in the sense of the Western scholarship about the Eastern World, is inextricably tied to the Author: Edward W. Saïd.   About Rethinking Orientalism. This book, the first full-length study of alternative dialogues between Ottoman and Western women and a major contribution to both Middle East and Cultural Studies, looks closely at writings from and about Istanbul by writers including Demetra Vaka Brown, Halide Edib, Zeyneb Hanum, Melek Hanum and Grace Ellison.   Rethinking Orientalism: Women, Travel and the Ottoman Harem. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, pp. ISBN , $ New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, pp. ISBN , $ In this book Reina Lewis focuses on a group of women writers whose travel accounts, memoirs, and fictions offer a non-Western engagement with the. Rethinking Orientalism: Women, Travel and the Ottoman Harem B y R eina L ewis (London: I.B. Tauris, ), xv, pp. Price HB £ ISBN 1–––: Mohammad Talib.

The oppressed yet highly sexualized woman of the Muslim harem is arguably the pivotal figure of Western orientalism. Yet, as Reina Lewis demonstrates, while orientalist thinking has recently been challenged, Western understandings of Middle Eastern culture remain limited. This book presents alternative dialogues between Ottoman and Western women. Lewis examines, from the position of . Get this from a library! Rethinking orientalism: women, travel and the Ottoman harem. [Reina Lewis] -- The oppressed yet highly sexualized woman of the Muslim harem is arguably the pivotal figure of Western orientalism. Yet, as Reina Lewis demonstrates, while orientalist thinking has recently been. Get this from a library! Rethinking orientalism: women, travel and the Ottoman harem. [Reina Lewis] -- Questioning the Western stereotype about the women of the Muslim harem, the author argues that, whilst Orientalist thinking has been challenged, the Western understanding of Middle Eastern culture. The oppressed yet highly sexualized woman of the Muslim harem is arguably the pivotal figure of Western orientalism. Yet, as Reina Lewis demonstrates, while orientalist thinking had recently been challenged, Western understandings of Middle Eastern culture remain limited. This book presents alternative dialogues between Ottoman and Western women.